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PM Šarec visited Slovenian soldiers in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo

Prime Minister Marjan Šarec visited Slovenian soldiers in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo on Monday and Tuesday.

Prime minister travelled to Kosovo, where he met with members of the Slovenian contingent at the NATO HQ in Priština

Prime minister travelled to Kosovo, where he met with members of the Slovenian contingent at the NATO HQ in Priština | Author Anže Malovrh, STA

Prime Minister Marjan Šarec visited with Slovenian soldiers in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo on Monday and Tuesday. He also met with the Commander of the EUFOR Althea forces, the Commander of NATO headquarters in Sarajevo and the Commander of KFOR. He said he hears nothing but praise for the members of the Slovenian armed forces engaged in missions there.

In Bosnia and Herzegovina, the prime minister met in separate meetings with Commander of the EUFOR Althea forces Major General Reinhard Trischak and Commander of NATO headquarters in Sarajevo, Brigadier General Marti J. Bissell. Both of them praised the Slovenian armed forces’ contribution to the missions. Both missions, the EU’s and NATO’s, are important for maintaining peace and stability in the region, said Šarec after the meetings.

The prime minister met with Slovenian soldiers in Bosnia and Herzegovina and learned about their mission and duties. Ten Slovenian soldiers are currently deployed in Althea, and four at NATO Headquarters.

From Bosnia and Herzegovina, the prime minister travelled to Kosovo, where he met with members of the Slovenian contingent at the NATO HQ in Priština. He also met with KFOR Commander Major General Michele Risi, who also lauded the work of the Slovenian soldiers working in Kosovo.

“The fact is that I hear only praise for our soldiers. Our soldiers are performing their duties in accordance with expectations and are an extremely active part of this mission,” said Šarec to Slovenian journalists after meeting with Risi.

Around 250 members of the Slovenian armed forces work in Kosovo, which is Slovenia’s largest foreign contingent. Their deployments there include a motorised brigade and six liaison and monitoring teams.

On Tuesday morning, the prime minister visited the Villaggio di Italia military camp in v Peć, where the majority of the Slovenian contingent are based. He also visited the Dečani Monastery, which is guarded by Slovenian soldiers.

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