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Foreign public documents may be used in the Republic of Slovenia only if they are legalised, unless when legalisation is not required by the sectoral legislation.

Certification or legalisation of a document means confirming the authenticity of the signatures of the official persons who signed the document, and the authenticity of the prints of the state authorities' seals on it. A public document must be certified if so required by the law of the country where you intend to use it.

Legalisation and the procedure for the assessment of education at the ENIC-NARIC Centre

Pursuant to Article 20 of the Assessment and Recognition of Education Act, "in the procedure for the assessment of education, legalisation is not required".

Legalisation and the procedure for the recognition of education for the purpose of continuing education in the Republic of Slovenia

In the procedure for the recognition of education for the purpose of continuing education, the legalisation of a foreign education certificate is required. Education certificates are legalised in accordance with the Verification of Documents in International Transport Act or the Act Ratifying the Convention Abolishing The Requirement Of Legalisation For Foreign Public Documents.  

States Parties to the Hague Convention in accordance with the Act Ratifying the Convention.

Positions of individual countries on the certification or legalisation of education certificates

We find that there exist different interpretations of the requirements for legalisation in accordance with the Act Ratifying the Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents, i.e. the "apostille" stamp. The Ministry of Justice provided the following opinion and information on the matter:

Information for specific countries as to what public documents no longer require certification or legalisation, i.e. the "apostille" stamp, in accordance with the agreement.

Republic of Austria

Bosnia and Herzegovina

French Republic

Cyprus

Republic of Bulgaria

Republic of Poland

Republic of Croatia

Czech Republic

Hungary

Romania

Republic of Srbia

Hellenic Republic

North Macedonia

Russian Federation

Given below are the summarised responses of the countries that have clearly identified their positions on the matter.

Austria states that only higher education certificates are exempt from certification, Cyprus considers that legalisation of certificates of public and private higher education institutions is not necessary, however, it is compulsory for private university diplomas and primary and secondary school certificates.

Poland and Hungary do not consider education certificates to be among the public documents subject to the agreement, although Hungary does not require additional certification for "nostrification" procedures. The Russian Federation considers that additional certification is necessary.

Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Serbia, France and the Czech Republic note that their education certificates are exempt from legalisation.

It should be emphasised that educational institutions have the right and the duty to check the education certificates with the issuer or the competent authority of the country of origin in case of doubt in the authenticity of such documents. Notwithstanding all of the above, educational institutions are also entitled to exceptionally request the apostille stamp in particular cases.

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